Iroquois Confederacy

Three may be a crowd, but six? That’s a confederacy! In this BrainPOP movie, Tim and Moby teach you all about the Iroquois Confederacy, a group of six rival American Indian nations who put aside their differences to form a powerful alliance. You’ll see how the territories of the six nations formed a symbolic longhouse across upstate New York--and learn exactly what a longhouse is! Explore Iroquois culture, from wampum belts to the progressive role of women. And learn how wars against rival Indians, the French, and eventually the United States shaped the Iroquois nations of today.
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Trail of Tears Lesson Plan: Dramatic Reenactment

Lesson Plan Summary In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-12, students use BrainPOP resources to explore how and why American Indians were uprooted from their homes. As students re-enact the events of the Trail of Tears, they will gain a deep understanding of a tragic era in history and identify what lessons we can learn from it. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

Trail of Tears Lesson Plan: American Indians and the Cherokee Culture

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades K through 3, students use BrainPOP Jr. resources to learn how and why American Indians were uprooted from their homes. Students will re-enact the events of the Trail of Tears and gain a deep understanding of Cherokee culture. They will also identify lessons we can learn from the tribe's experiences. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

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In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-12, students select two topics in United States history and use BrainPOP resources to explore the relationship between those topics. Students will work collaboratively to determine the cause and effect relationships and present their research to the class in a creative format of their choice. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

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