John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy is one of the most popular Presidents in American history. In this BrainPOP movie, Tim and Moby will explain exactly why. You’ll learn about Kennedy’s privileged upbringing in Massachusetts, his heroism in the Pacific during World War II, and the Pulitzer Prize he won for a bestselling book about courageous U.S. Senators. You’ll hear about the ups and downs of his presidency, from the disaster that was the Bay of Pigs invasion, to his strategic triumph over the Soviet Union during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Finally, you’ll meet his family and hear about the tragic circumstances surrounding his death. So ask not what this BrainPOP movie can do for you—ask what you can do for this BrainPOP movie!

The President! Lesson Plan: The Role of the President of the United States

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades K-3, students use BrainPOP Jr. resources to explore why the United States has a President and the role of the President in our government. Students will also learn the requirements for becoming the President, and explore how the President interacts with the three branches of government. See more »

U.S. History Lesson Plan: Exploring Cause and Effect

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-12, students select two topics in United States history and use BrainPOP resources to explore the relationship between those topics. Students will work collaboratively to determine the cause and effect relationships and present their research to the class in a creative format of their choice. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

Famous Historical Figures Lesson Plan: Who Am I?

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for any grade level, students use BrainPOP resources to explore the life and works of historical figures. Students will research their selected historical figure, create a "Who Am I?" bag of clues about their figure, and invite classmates to deduce which historical figure they researched. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

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