William Shakespeare

If you need to brush up your Shakespeare, you’ve come to the right place. In this BrainPOP movie, Tim and Moby give you a brief overview of the life and career of the Bard of Avon. You’ll learn how this son of a provincial glove-maker became one of London’s most celebrated playwrights before his 30th birthday. You’ll get a quick look at some of Shakespeare’s most well-known comedies, histories, and tragedies, including Hamlet, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest. Finally, you’ll hear about the Globe Theater, where some of these plays were first staged, and how Shakespeare made sure that everyone in the audience had something to enjoy. So click on this movie--we’re sure you’ll enjoy Shakespeare too!
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