Asthma Movie Activities for Kids

Grade Levels: K-3

In this set of activities adaptable for grades K-3, parents and educators will find ideas for teaching about the respiratory system, lungs, and asthma. These activities are designed to complement the BrainPOP Jr. Asthma topic page, which includes a movie, quizzes, online games, printable activities, and more.

Classroom Activities for Teaching About Asthma

Just Breathe

Divide students up into groups and have them write a skit about someone going through an asthma attack. Where is the person? What triggered the attack? The skit should relay what to do during an attack and how to avoid future attacks. Groups can perform their skits in front of the class. Have one student from each group lead a discussion about their skit.

Asthma and Athletes

There are many professional and Olympic athletes who live with asthma. Olympic sprinter Jackie Joyner-Kersee, former professional basketball player Dennis Rodman, and professional tennis player Justine Henin are all accomplished athletes who have successfully managed their asthma. Have students research athletes who have asthma and choose one to be the subject of a biography or profile. Then have students share their presentations with the class.

Family and Homeschool Activities for Teaching About Asthma

Living Lungs

With your child, research lungs in the library or on the Internet. What functions do the lungs perform? What are the major parts of the lung? After your child is familiar with healthy lungs, research asthmatic lungs. How are healthy and asthmatic lungs alike? How are they different? Have your child explain what happens in asthmatic lungs.

Trigger Chart

Together with your child, draw a T-chart or a table with two columns. Brainstorm possible triggers of asthma attacks and write them down on the left side of the chart. Then work together to brainstorm ideas about how to control these triggers. Record your ideas on the right side of the chart. If your child has asthma, keep the chart in a trigger journal (as Mia did in the movie) so your child can learn to analyze the causes of his or her flare-ups and how to prevent them.