Fire Safety Activities for Kids

Grade Levels: K-3

In this set of activities adaptable for grades K-3, parents and educators will find ideas for teaching about fire safety. These activities are designed to complement the BrainPOP Jr. Fire Safety topic page, which includes a movie, quizzes, online games, printable activities, and more.

Classroom Activities for Teaching Fire Safety

Line ‘Em Up
Review what to do during a fire drill. Have students practice lining up near the door. Challenge them to do it as quickly as possible and without a sound. You may want to time them and have the class see how fast they can line up. This is a great opportunity to compare numbers and learn about elapsed time.

Meet a Firefighter

Invite a firefighter to visit your class or school to talk about fire safety. Many retired firefighters are available to talk to students and answer questions. Before the interview, brainstorm questions students would like to ask. Have the firefighter review how to stay safe during a fire and provide fire-prevention tips. Afterward, ask children what they should do if they see a fire. You may wish to have them write or draw about the proper procedures and take home the paper to display on the refrigerator for family reference.

Family and Homeschool Activities for Teaching About Fire Safety

Emergency Plan

Call a family meeting and come up with an emergency plan together. Discuss safe exits from your home and choose a meeting spot in case people get separated. Write down a list of emergency contacts and make sure everyone in the family knows where the list is kept. If your child has a cell phone, you may want to help him or her program the numbers into the phone. Also give a tour of your home to point out the smoke detectors and fire extinguishers. You may want to hold a home fire drill and review emergency procedures, such as crawling if smoke is present and checking doors and doorknobs to see if they are hot or very warm.

Who You Gonna Call?

Your child should remember key phone numbers of emergency contacts, such as cell phone numbers of parents or guardians. Help your child memorize a few key phone numbers, as well as your home address and the full names of adults in the household. You may want to make up a song to remember the phone numbers or put it to a tune of a nursery song. In addition, keep a list of emergency contacts by your home phone and programmed into cell phones.