Life Cycle of a Plant Lesson Plan: Create a Mini Book

Submitted by: Andrea Miller

Grade Levels: K-3

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades K-3, students use BrainPOP Jr. resources to describe and illustrate the life cycle of a plant. Students create a mini book to record and share their understandings.

Lesson Plan Common Core State Standards Alignments

Students will:

  1. Describe and illustrate the life cycle of a plant

Materials:

  • As the students are working on their mini books, pull up the Plant Life Cycle movie on your classroom computers and allow students to take turns watching it. Or, you could use your projector to show the movie to small groups of students, pausing throughout to discuss it and answer questions.
  • Computer and projector to access BrainPOP Jr. resources
  • Student copies of Mini Book 2 to make a Life Cycle of an Apple mini book
  • "The Tiny Seed" book by Eric Carle

Vocabulary:

flower; fruit; germinate; growing; leaves; life cycle; plants; roots; seed; seedling; soil; sprout; stem, sun; water

Lesson Procedure:

  1. To build background knowledge, use the Talk About It feature from the Plant Life Cycle movie. You can project this from your computer and type directly into it. Ask students to tell you what they already know about the life cycle of a plant and how seeds become adult plants. Record their facts on the chart.
  2. Share Eric Carle's "The Tiny Seed" and discuss the stages of the plant's life cycle. Make changes to the original "Talk About It" chart, if needed.
  3. Introduce the Life Cycle of an Apple mini book and walk the students through the steps in creating it. Have the students work independently or with a partner to create their mini books.
  4. As the students are working on their mini books, pull up the Plant Life Cycle movie on your classroom computers and allow students to take turns watching it. Or, you could use your projector to show the movie to small groups of students, pausing throughout to discuss it and answer questions.
  5. When students are finished creating their mini books, challenge them to work with a partner to “act out” a planted seed sprouting. (Example: crouch close to the ground (seed), slowly straighten your legs first (roots growing), raise your arms above your head and then out to your side (stem and leaves), maybe even spread your fingers out for flowers.)
  6. As a closing activity, have the class take either the easy quiz or the hard quiz together and discuss student answers.