Pictographs Activities for Kids

Grade Levels: K-3

Classroom Activities for Teaching Pictographs

These K-3 activities provide parents and educators with ideas for reinforcing learning at home about pictographs. These activities are designed to complement the BrainPOP Jr. Pictographs topic page, which includes a movie, quizzes, online games, printable activities, and more.

Favorite Fruit
Create a survey together about students’ favorite fruit. Come up with a question together and have students take the survey. Record their answers on the board using a tally chart. You may want students to come up to the board and record their choice on the tally chart themselves. Be sure to instruct them to mark every fifth tally mark across the other four. Then use the data in the tally chart to create a pictograph. To challenge students, have each symbol in the graph stand for more than one vote, such as two or three. Display the pictograph in the classroom. If possible, serve the fruit that gets the most votes.

Data Miners

Have students bring in a pictograph, bar graph, or other graph into class. Children may want to clip graphs from magazines or newspapers, or find them online and print them out. Then choose a few graphs to discuss and analyze together. Challenge students to take the same information in the graph and display it using another kind of graph.

Family and Homeschool Activities for Teaching Pictographs

Vote for a Sport

Be active with your child! Create a survey about favorite sports, such as swimming, soccer, basketball, or baseball. Then have your child survey his or her friends about their favorite sport. You may want to review how to record votes using a tally chart. Then create a pictograph to display the information. Afterward, gather the friends together to play the sport that got the most votes!

Take a Walk

Plan a hike or walk with your child. Before your trip, make predictions about what interesting things you might see and create a tally chart to organize the possibilities. Bring the tally chart along on your walk and have your child record what he or she sees. After, analyze the data together. How many birds did you see? How many dogs? How many more squirrels did you see than people? What did you see the most of? The least? Have your child turn the tally chart information into a pictograph and share it with the rest of the family.