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TEACH WITH THIS GAME
SUBJECTS
Math
Science
FOR GRADES
3-5
5-8
9-12
TYPE
Interactive
TIME TO PLAY
Short
ASSESSMENT TOOLS
SUBJECTSMath, Science
GREAT FOR GRADES3-5, 5-8, 9-12
AVG TIME TO PLAYShort (< 15)
ASSESSMENT TOOLS
Mix Your Own Quiz
COMMON CORE STANDARD ALIGNMENT
Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an unknown characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the same size to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions. For example, estimate the mean word length in a book by randomly sampling words from the book; predict the winner of a school election based on randomly sampled survey data. Gauge how far off the estimate or prediction might be.
Describe events as subsets of a sample space (the set of outcomes) using characteristics (or categories) of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections, or complements of other events (“or,” “and,” “not”).
Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. For example, “How old am I?” is not a statistical question, but “How old are the students in my school?” is a statistical question because one anticipates variability in students’ ages.
(+) Apply the general Multiplication Rule in a uniform probability model, P(A and B) = P(A)P(B|A) = P(B)P(A|B), and interpret the answer in terms of the model.
Understand that two events A and B are independent if the probability of A and B occurring together is the product of their probabilities, and use this characterization to determine if they are independent.
Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling.
Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.
Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population.
Approximate the probability of a chance event by collecting data on the chance process that produces it and observing its long-run relative frequency, and predict the approximate relative frequency given the probability. For example, when rolling a number cube 600 times, predict that a 3 or 6 would be rolled roughly 200 times, but probably not exactly 200 times.